SME’s do you need value for money tools that support you to communicate with your clients?

Most small businesses struggle to find interpreters and translators not because they don’t want to but because they are not aware of what is available, or do not have the flexibility in their cash flow to allow them to secure the right person at the right time.  Unless the business revolves around languages then buying in expertise or a member of staff is not within their grasp. In reality we cannot all be linguists but we do need to be able to bridge the gap to communicate.

With our tools and resources you can easily communicate, with a set yearly charge (no hidden extras), available all day every day, day or night, at your fingertips.

Communicate across languages with EMASUK SMT's

Communicate across languages

Available as an app or on a tablet there are versions available for platforms including Apple, androids, Kindle fire and tablets.

To find out more contact us on 0845 009 4939 or info@emasuk.com Ask for your free phone walk through of how we can support you to communicate with your customers.

 

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How to cut your £140m bill for public sector translation – Simples

Cutting your public sector translation bill has never been easier.  If you want;

ü  access to translation 24/7

ü  to be in charge of the conversation

ü  access at the tip of your fingertips in an emergency

ü  a translation solution at a set cost with no hidden extras to enable easier budgeting

ü  If you want access to more than one language at a time

Be a LEADER and not a follower and save yourself costs associated with communicating with your customers, clients and patients.

The news story used as a starting point   http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-25933699 further goes on to say that…

Lincolnshire has seen a large number of migrant workers settle in the county in recent years – the majority from Eastern Europe. I met Juarate Matulioniene, a leading figure in Boston’s Lithuanian community. She told me that the majority of migrants wanted to learn English, but sometimes they needed a helping hand.

Ms Matulioniene said: “Translation is very important in an emergency, when we go to hospitals and when children go to school and they don’t know a word.”  – This is where our services can be used effectively reassuring both the customer and your members of staff.

Lincolnshire County Council spends £155,000 a year on translation services.  UKIP councillors have called for the programme to be scrapped and the money re-invested in frontline services.

For schools who need resources in Lithuanian we can offer a resource library with many curriculum resources inside, Text Tutor and  Books – Maths, Pip, Resource and Exam which can be found on the online bookstore. http://shop.emasuk.com/search.wtl I searched for Lithuanian. Ask for a complete package special price.

Simply email info@emasuk.com or call 0845 009 4939.

Talking Tutor is useful for Design Technology and Science teaching

As a Design Technology -Resistant Material specialist many teachers I have worked with see it as a subject that is easily accessed by EAL pupils. This is mainly through misconception as they believe that as it is a largely practical subject then they can access it. What colleagues often forget is that, like Science, the practical aspect of a design challenge is only one small part of a process. Also included are the complex tasks of time management, development of an idea from concept to delivery, evaluation of the process which requires the development and use of investigative and planning skills throughout. There is also a high level of academic language required to understand the individual process involved.
Using Talking Tutor to give information to support their language development is really easy and also allows you or a teaching assistant to use previous experience to support and develop their learning quicker. It works very simply just put yourselves in their shoes.
Using Talking Tools

Using Talking Tools

Imagine you don’t speak a language e.g. GREEK. You can speak English as this is your first language and at this point only language, you have been to school for a few years so know basic mathematical concepts, tools and their names. You go to a school where everything is in GREEK what do you do? You are still the same person but suddenly language is a barrier.  The school has two options;
Option A – Take you to the side, in small groups and teach you Greek from scratch like you would teach a toddler but expect recollection to be quicker due to age – this is  a much practiced was that I see in many schools that are not challenging or innovative enough
Option B  – recognise they know what we mean by the academic word adding up, drawing, cut etc. but in Greek so share the word for this concept in English. In this way it speeds up the academic words learning process. It also improves the level of understanding.
In my school I always choose option B mainly as I have always had a time constraint called exams where everyone is tasked to achieve. By using Text Tutor which is currently on offer you can easily support academic language development in DT or any subject with a little extra thought about where the best use will be. NB Depending on the age of the child, those schools where access is always available and learning is paramount in their room, the students learn to just log on and find out the equivalent word and then get on with what they are doing. Interested?
Text Tutor

Text Tutor

In the fractions of seconds it took my English-starved brain to process words like “Césarienne,” Dr. Martin had already spewed 15 more. This was a conversation I desperately needed to understand.

The new article http://watchnewspapers.com/bookmark/24549811-RAISING-ELLE-A-Compelling-Argument-for-Bilingual-Education really sets the scene from the patients point of view when dealing with medical issues. It also bears out our research at a Coventry hospital gynecological and maternity unit where patients found Clairetalk to be invaluable.

Using an interpreter can be an issue when the interpreter is male, when we are doing intimate examinations or discussing sensitive issues. The women can be less forth coming with information. NHS staff feedback re Clairetalk

The patient in this article clearly cites incidences where she feels the experience could have been improved but also where Education embracing bilingualism could also support more children in schools.

Six years ago this week I was sitting naked in a doctor’s examining chair, nine months pregnant and attempting to understand what my French-speaking OB-GYN was talking about.

It was an unsettling experience indeed, the naked and enormously nine-month-pregnant part, since it was a rude awakening to learn that the French don’t seem to care that those flimsy paper coverups exist. After spending half of my pregnancy and giving birth to my first child in France, and thus spending an exorbitant amount of time naked on examining tables, I vowed I would never take disposable exam gowns for granted again.

My modesty aside, the experience was most disquieting due to the fact that French words were rattling like pinballs inside my head. In the fractions of seconds it took my English-starved brain to process words like “Césarienne,” Dr. Martin had already spewed 15 more that I didn’t have the time or mental fortitude to translate. And this was a conversation I desperately needed to understand.

Two weeks before my due date, I sat in that chair as my already frazzled language-learning synapses grasped frantically at every four or fifth word I could comprehend. Painstakingly, after many sheepish requests that he “Parlez plus lentement, s’il vous plait” (speak slower, please), I was able to stack together enough of the puzzle to understand what he was telling me.

(Dr. Martin spoke one word of English: naked. So the beginning of the appointment had gone well. He pointed at me and commanded, “Naked!” so that’s what I did. It went downhill from there. Dr. Martin made it clear that he found it utterly annoying that an American woman would come to France and need her doctor to speak English. Some things, I discovered during our winter in France, need no translation.)

My “accouchement” (birth) would be “anormal” (abnormal) because the baby soon to be  known as Elodie was “au siege” (breech), and I would need to plan for a “Césarienne,” (C-section.) It would be next week, on Fevrier 22, merci et au revoir!

It was certainly my choice to put myself in the uncomfortable position of being giant-bellied and stark naked in a country where I spoke the language as well as a native 2-year-old. So I took the mental battering as well as I could, considering our circumstances, and now that I look back, I’m more grateful than ever that Craig and I were naïve enough to think that having a baby in France would be “pas de problem.”

I have a beautiful daughter with a French name and birth certificate, and, in addition, a much more acute appreciation of the need for learning a second language.

Last month, the Telluride School District’s Global Fluency Committee gave a presentation on incorporating bilingual education into the elementary school curriculum. More than half of the world’s population (65 percent) are bilingual or multilingual. Young children learn languages easily, and learning another language has been shown to enhance a child’s proficiency in his or her native tongue, we learned.

While in France, I noticed that nearly everyone in Tignes, the ski resort where we lived for a season, on Ski Patrol exchange, spoke at least enough English to get by. Nearly half of that resort’s visitors come from English-speaking countries, so speaking English is just a part of doing business. I also observed, with much awe, that the children in the Tignes preschool were already being given lessons in English.

As it turns out, France isn’t the only place where non-native languages are quickly gaining traction.

School-age children who speak a language other than English at home are one of the fastest-growing populations in the United States, studies suggest. Their numbers doubled between 1980 and 2009, and now comprise 21 percent of school-age kids.

There were 4.7 million students classified as “English language learners” – those who have not yet achieved proficiency in English – in the 2009-10 school year, or about 10 percent of children enrolled, according to the most recent figures available from the U.S. Department of Education.

Bilingual education has long been a hot-button issue in America, raising issues like immigration and civil rights. California, Massachusetts and Arizona have actually banned bilingual education, claiming that it hinders, rather than helps, students who lack proficiency in English.

Thus far, much of the bilingual-education debate has centered around whether or not bringing  non-English speakers to English proficiency is the duty of the public school system, and if so, how can it best be done. Statistics show that many schools’ non-English speakers actually fare worse in standardized tests when educated under a bilingual system.

Yet proponents of bilingual education counter that the schools boasting the highest percentages of non-English speakers, which offer some form of bilingual education, are usually located in the lowest-income school districts and thus face an array of roadblocks to offering quality education overall, including large class size and insufficiently trained teachers.

The bilingual education debate isn’t new. In response to a growing outcry that non-English-speaking students weren’t getting an equal education due to a dearth of teachers and programs promoting multilingual studies, Congress passed the Bilingual Education Act in 1968. Later, the National Advisory Council on Bilingual Education was formed to articulate a plan for a national policy in bilingual education.

In the language of the federal law: “Where inability to speak and understand the English language excludes national origin minority group children from effective participation in the educational program offered by a school district, the district must take affirmative steps to rectify the language deficiency in order to open its instructional program to these students.”

Yet a part of the debate that seems to be emerging more recently centers around the idea that bilingual education can benefit students other than those who don’t speak English. English-speaking students, when educated early under a truly bilingual program (in which 50 percent of class time is spent speaking English and 50 percent speaking another language, like the system TSD’s Global Fluency Committee has proposed,) have been shown to excel in their native language as well as a second language. As bilingual graduates, they enter a growingly diverse world job market better prepared. And though studies can’t prove it, I’m willing to bet that on average, citizens who speak another language would have a healthier respect and understanding of other cultures.

Let’s end the debate and start seeing the world, and our children’s place in it, for what it really is: Culturally and linguistically diverse. Let’s raise our children with not just a healthy respect for other cultures and languages, but with a solid comprehension of those cultures and languages. And that means educating them early in the languages of other cultures.

I heartily applaud the Telluride School District’s Global Fluency Committee’s forward-thinking approach to closing the multilingualism gap that currently exists between American students and the rest of the world. Let’s raise up all of our community’s students, by offering them the chance to speak the all-inclusive language of cultural acceptance.

What do you think? I am sure our doctors dont have the same attitude as the patients doctor all I have met want to support their patients the best way possible.

For Health providers if you want more information about Clairetalk go to the website http://www.emasuk.com and choose Healthcare

For education if you want more information about Talking Tutor, Text Tutor and our award winning two can Talk again choose http://www.emasuk.com and choose Education.

or email us at info@emasuk.com or call

NHS pricing guidelines

NHS pricing guidelines

Text Tutor Offer – £99.00 RRP £300.00

Educationalists – When a new learner joins your school, how do you welcome them into yours school’s pastoral environment prior to the first time in a classroom? With an English speaking child we would normally give them a welcome pack with school times, uniforms or dress code, important places such as the dining room and important people on, and maybe some tips on how the parents can support them to improve their academic abilities.
Until now this has meant expensive translators and hours of work. But with Text Tutor, our award winning translation tool, it now only takes minutes and the same message can go out in 60 languages at the touch of a button.

Ideal for:

  • Letters to home for  absenteeism etc.
  • School forms such as  admission
  • School signs
  • Scaffolded support sheets
  • Newsletters
  • Welcome booklets

Doctors and Healthcare workers – When a patient enters your surgery or busy A and E how would you normally find out which language the patient speaks when care is critical? As with Education you can use this in real time situations to create written detail in over 60 languages at the touch of a button.

Police and Solicitors – When your prisoner/ client arrives that speaks little or no English at initial consultation how do you communicate to ensure you get both get the best from the consultation, even if it just to get the right translator for you?

Our February special offer is Text Tutor for only £99 normally £300. Buy today and get 12 months unlimited use of Text Tutor.
To take advantage of this offer please contact us at info@emasuk.com or 0845 009 4939

February Offer – Text Tutor £99.00 for 60 languages

Text Tutor – OFFER £99 for 60 languages.
Using it in your environment to communicate across languages is easy, here are a few examples below:
• Administration staff: application forms, newsletter, letters, timetables, permission slips.
• Doctors/surgeries/hospitals: labels for displays, signs for equipment and letters to patients
• Team Leaders: Letters, meetings, information to customers….
These are a few of the ways they are used but there are many more.
For February only a price of just £99 for 1 years membership.
Contact us at info@emasuk or 0845 009 4939 for access to support in all of the the following languages Afrikaans, Albanian, Arabic, Basque, Belarusian, Bengali, Bulgarian, Catalan, Chinese Cantonese, Chinese Mandarin, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Filipino, Finnish, French, Galician, Georgian, German, Greek, Gujarati, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Kannada, Latin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Maltese, Nepali, Norwegian, Persian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Urdu, Vietnamese, Welsh and Yiddish working out at just £1.65 per language.
February 2014 Offer

February 2014 Offer

Using EMASUK resources in a nursery setting

Following on from last weeks feedback from a nursery we have received emails asking us how our tools and resources can support nurseries, as up until now they believed that they were stuck.

Using Talking Tools

Here are a few of our suggestions.

Find the resource EAL through storyboards in the library, under English, then choose a language or the languages in your setting. Use this to play finger rhymes Peter and Paul, Humpty Dumpty and Twinkle Twinkle. Support this further by using  Terry (Talking Tutor) to say out the words in the child’s first language then repeat in English. Add to this further and develop language by asking one child to be Peter and ask them to hide, when the Rhyme suggests Peter returns and then answers questions about where he has been ( this is great for advanced learners).

Literacy through Storyboards

Literacy through Storyboards

Sandbox – Use the sandbox to reinforce words e.g. use Terry (Talking tutor) to speak aloud words such as dig, cover and act it out, then repeat in English.

Game – Where is the Dragon – Ble mae Ddraig? Choose a stuffed toy bear, duck, or in this case a dragon (well I am Welsh) etc. and tell the children they are going to play where is the Dragon. Use Terry (Talking Tutor) to say this in the home language. Place the dragon on, in, under items and then repeat. Less advanced learners will start of by saying on, there (and point to where it is) whereas more advance learners can expand and use their vocabulary by explaining, where it is, naming the item it is on, or under and construct the sentence well.

Or snap see example below.

Snap Cards - Insects

Use the Interactive whiteboard to learn shape or animal names. Ask the children to hide a bird and items on the board this could be a shape – e.g. behind the square, on top of the circle.

Add bilingual labels around the classroom. Sentences are better than words, remember to use small sentences to ensure they can use the word in context.

Bilingual Poster showing colours in English and Lithuanian.

Bilingual Poster showing colours in English and Lithuanian.

Use bilingual colouring sheets to support and embed language acquisition.

Colouring Sheet - Bee

Colouring Sheet – Bee

Teach rhymes and then translate them and send them home to mum and dad remember that they don’t rhyme in other languages.

Don’t forget songs are always good. Simple songs remind us of learning pattern, words, pitch, tunefulness and happiness. Use Talking Tutor, text tutor or Two Can Talk to translate songs and ask parents to help.

Communicate across languages with EMASUK SMT's

Communicate across languages

Remember that CVC words do not always translate as CVC words e.g. dog become chien

Finally look in the teachers section for the Early Year sheets for parents.

Parents Guide

Parents Guide