EMASUK resources and tools- a new, inclusive and equitable approach to linguistic diversity

Multilingualism, far from being a problem, can be part of the solution to Europe’s current impasse: multilingual people are better at multitasking, are more creative and innovative; multilingual people have a greater capacity for being open-minded and perceptive; multilingual people are a more mobile workforce and often obtain better-paid jobs. To sum therefore, multilingual people are better-equipped for the challenges of today’s world! 

That is why we have created resources and tools to support you whatever your workforce turnover or needs.

Hospitals never know the nationality of their next patient or their spoken language but they need sometimes act quickly to make the patient better.

Councils also never know the nationality of their next customer/client yet still have to communicate. This can prove to be costly not only financially but in time waiting for someone to help and the patience of the two people invoved.

Business leaders trade over many borders through different languages but cannot expect to be fluent themselves in every langauge that they wish to engage in.

Make you and your team multilingual with the touch of a button and our ward winning TWO CAN TALK software.

See the website or contact us on info@emasuk.com

How to cut your £140m bill for public sector translation – Simples

Cutting your public sector translation bill has never been easier.  If you want;

ü  access to translation 24/7

ü  to be in charge of the conversation

ü  access at the tip of your fingertips in an emergency

ü  a translation solution at a set cost with no hidden extras to enable easier budgeting

ü  If you want access to more than one language at a time

Be a LEADER and not a follower and save yourself costs associated with communicating with your customers, clients and patients.

The news story used as a starting point   http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-25933699 further goes on to say that…

Lincolnshire has seen a large number of migrant workers settle in the county in recent years – the majority from Eastern Europe. I met Juarate Matulioniene, a leading figure in Boston’s Lithuanian community. She told me that the majority of migrants wanted to learn English, but sometimes they needed a helping hand.

Ms Matulioniene said: “Translation is very important in an emergency, when we go to hospitals and when children go to school and they don’t know a word.”  – This is where our services can be used effectively reassuring both the customer and your members of staff.

Lincolnshire County Council spends £155,000 a year on translation services.  UKIP councillors have called for the programme to be scrapped and the money re-invested in frontline services.

For schools who need resources in Lithuanian we can offer a resource library with many curriculum resources inside, Text Tutor and  Books – Maths, Pip, Resource and Exam which can be found on the online bookstore. http://shop.emasuk.com/search.wtl I searched for Lithuanian. Ask for a complete package special price.

Simply email info@emasuk.com or call 0845 009 4939.

Text Tutor Offer – £99.00 RRP £300.00

Educationalists – When a new learner joins your school, how do you welcome them into yours school’s pastoral environment prior to the first time in a classroom? With an English speaking child we would normally give them a welcome pack with school times, uniforms or dress code, important places such as the dining room and important people on, and maybe some tips on how the parents can support them to improve their academic abilities.
Until now this has meant expensive translators and hours of work. But with Text Tutor, our award winning translation tool, it now only takes minutes and the same message can go out in 60 languages at the touch of a button.

Ideal for:

  • Letters to home for  absenteeism etc.
  • School forms such as  admission
  • School signs
  • Scaffolded support sheets
  • Newsletters
  • Welcome booklets

Doctors and Healthcare workers – When a patient enters your surgery or busy A and E how would you normally find out which language the patient speaks when care is critical? As with Education you can use this in real time situations to create written detail in over 60 languages at the touch of a button.

Police and Solicitors – When your prisoner/ client arrives that speaks little or no English at initial consultation how do you communicate to ensure you get both get the best from the consultation, even if it just to get the right translator for you?

Our February special offer is Text Tutor for only £99 normally £300. Buy today and get 12 months unlimited use of Text Tutor.
To take advantage of this offer please contact us at info@emasuk.com or 0845 009 4939

A message from Bruce

Today we would like to introduce the newest member of our team Bruce who has written this message.

For the last 5 years, EMAS UK has been helping schools and hospitals communicate with people who do not speak English as a first language.

The world is in your hands.

The world is in your hands.

In 2014, in partnership with BM Consultancy, their award winning product is being launched into the private sector to assist solicitors, accountants, and other professionals in communicating with their non-English speaking clients in a cost effective manner.

What can EMAS UK do for you?

·         Personal, private and discrete

·         No waiting, instant communication

·         No expensive, lengthy telephone calls

·         Greatly reduces the need for expensive translators / interpreters

·         Communicate in 26 languages

·         Pre-populate commonly used phrases

·         Listen to the response in English

·         Securely save a transcription in pdf format

·         Print a copy of the conversation for the client

·         Peace of mind that your client has fully understood your advice

I am based in the South West, so please contact me to arrange for me to visit your offices to briefly explain how EMAS UK can help you and your clients.

Bruce Moss

Tel: 07500 008092

Email: bruce.moss@bmconsultancy.co.uk

Be in charge of your conversations, dont risk these headlines ‘Fake’ interpreter at Mandela memorial claims to have exposed system

EMASUK’s translation solutions for Health, Education, Business and Local Government put you back in charge of translated conversation ensuring you are clear what is being communicated to the third party. It is available to you just when you need it and its variety of platforms portability makes it easy to use in your situation.

As teachers John and I have been in the situation where we have not known what the true conversation is between the interpreter/translator and the student but supporting those of us who don’t speak the language has traditionally been difficult, hence our solution. Type in what you want to say, have it said aloud in that language, hear it in English whilst watching the body language and facial expressions – it puts you back in charge.

Communicate across languages with EMASUK SMT's

Communicate across languages with EMASUK

 

To be back in charge of conversations contact us on 0845 009 4939 or email info@emasuk.com.

 

European Day of Languages

Thursday will see us celebrating the European Day of Languages. Thirty years ago many of us would only have been aware of a minority of languages depending on what was known around the area where we lived.  To day  throughout the country many of us are communicating with others that also speak Polish as well as our native English and increasingly languages like Czech, Slovak, Lithuanian, Turkish, Hungarian, French and Latvian. This is difficult for those of you in the front line as your Lithuanian may not be anywhere as good as their English even if their English is considered poor.  That is where Clairetalk, Two Can Talk and Talking Tutor come into their own as you can type in English and have it spoken aloud in all of these languages. To speak across languages Two Can Talk is great as they can then type in their language and you can hear it in English.  Brilliant at A and E when decisions need to be made fast and in schools or doctors surgeries where you need more in-depth conversation and also a record of the conversation.

 

Celebrate with us and look out on our Facebook page for a great deal Thursday only.

Being Bilingual isn’t easy

Being bilingual isn’t easy as the writer of the article below says. Often the children and adults feel that they are not part of any culture.  Not part of their first language culture as they no longer live in the country and not part of the second culture as they have not grown roots in the country where they presently live and also have no history on first arrival.

 

This bilingual thing … they say that it’s a both curse and a blessing. Watakushigotode kyōshukudesuga (私事で恐縮ですが, A thousand pardons for having the gall to talk about myself), but I think of it more like a stigma

It was tougher for boys. My brothers learned very quickly that scoring 100 in English earned no respect and kept girls (the pretty, fun ones especially) away. What counted was stuff like getting the regulā (レギュラー, starting member) slot in the yakyūbu (野球部, baseball team), or owning one’s very own baiku (バイク, motorcycle) and letting it rip on some bōsōzoku (暴走族, motorcycle gang) strip in Chiba or Shonan. Failing in both, my brothers decided to delete their entire pasts and pretend they couldn’t speak a single word of English. The ploy worked. In a few months their facial expressions and body language had completely changed. If the school had given out awards for assimilation, my brothers would have taken home every one.

For girls, the big obstacle to assimilation was our penchant for freedom and having a good time. Now of course, tanoshimukoto (楽しむこと, enjoying oneself) is a phrase bandied about by everyone from shōgakusei (小学生, grade schoolers) to daijin (大臣, Cabinet ministers). But 30 years ago anyone who behaved too freely and got around was under suspicion. A real Japanese was supposed to kurō (苦労, suffer), don’t ask why. As a kikoku jyoshi (キコク女子, returnee girl), I just didn’t get it. And by the time the office memo about the suffering thing came around, it was too late.

This is why celebrating their first language and using it to support them to learn English in context is a radical but humane and linguistically  correct way for us in the 22nd century to be moving. This allows them to feel part of the community whilst they settle in but also helps them to communicate with officials, schools, businesses in a far better way than with the methods previously used.

If you are still not convinced read the story below and have a look at our YouTube video showing what we have to offer to support contextual learning of English, to  support keeping the first language alive which leads to better communication for all. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEdVSgz5YOk

 

Interestingly, being a hāfu (ハーフ, half Japanese) has never had the same stigma of being a kikoku. A hāfu was the coolest thing a nihonjin (日本人, Japanese person) could be. Just witness the number of mixed-race idoru (アイドル, idols) and tarento (タレント, celebrities) crowding the media (my favorite is Anna Tsuchiya).

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/life/2013/05/13/language/it-aint-easy-being-a-bilingual-girl/#.UZJcU4dwYdU