Traditional v 21st Century language translation methods. Which are you?

This is an interesting story that really makes you think about language acquisition.

A power couple in neuroscience, professors Patricia Kuhl and Andrew Meltzoff were in Hong Kong recently to give a talk on their respective areas of expertise – emotional quotient and intelligence quotient – and the role of each in language acquisition.  http://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/family-education/article/1456247/between-lines-why-bilingualism-childs-play

For me I am left with the feeling that traditional methods are wholly useless, and no matter how long a person tries to learn a language or how much money they spend then they are already setting themselves up for a fall. However people still tell us if we are to communicate across language then we must speak another language. For me I think we just need to simply communicate.

It is difficult to acquire language later in life because the brain loses its elasticity. In terms of learning new languages past the age of seven, Kuhl posits that the “window of learning” stays open longer for children who were exposed to different languages as babies.

I believe that if this research is true then those who have had no exposure to other languages as a child, will struggle as adults and depending on when this influence stopped their wired connections in the brain are already being depleted.

Kuhl found early language skills predict future reading abilities, and skills not developed early are difficult to remediate later on.

This is where I believe EMASUK comes into its own.

  • We don’t want people to fail.
  • We understand that not everyone is a linguist, not everyone can learn many languages yet the way people are moving globally this is in some cities and expectation.
  • What we do all want to do is communicate whether with colleagues, customers or other adults, no matter what field you are in. For the vast majority of us that means recognising where we are and then looking for a way to bridge the gap.

Our award winning Talking Tool called Two can Talk or ClaireTalk (in health settings) does this easily and relatively cheaply. Using two key boards and 26 languages it is possible to communicate across these languages simply and effectively at low cost 24 hours a day.

So which will you be?

  1. traditional continuing to do what you have always done and wondering why it isn’t having an effect? or
  2. use the toosl and knowledge available to me today to develop my communication skills?

If you chose number 2 the contact us for more details  info@emasuk.com, 07824612965 for more details.

Bruce Moss

Tel: 07500 008092

Email: bruce.moss@bmconsultancy.co.uk

Advertisements

Text Tutor Offer – £99.00 RRP £300.00

Educationalists – When a new learner joins your school, how do you welcome them into yours school’s pastoral environment prior to the first time in a classroom? With an English speaking child we would normally give them a welcome pack with school times, uniforms or dress code, important places such as the dining room and important people on, and maybe some tips on how the parents can support them to improve their academic abilities.
Until now this has meant expensive translators and hours of work. But with Text Tutor, our award winning translation tool, it now only takes minutes and the same message can go out in 60 languages at the touch of a button.

Ideal for:

  • Letters to home for  absenteeism etc.
  • School forms such as  admission
  • School signs
  • Scaffolded support sheets
  • Newsletters
  • Welcome booklets

Doctors and Healthcare workers – When a patient enters your surgery or busy A and E how would you normally find out which language the patient speaks when care is critical? As with Education you can use this in real time situations to create written detail in over 60 languages at the touch of a button.

Police and Solicitors – When your prisoner/ client arrives that speaks little or no English at initial consultation how do you communicate to ensure you get both get the best from the consultation, even if it just to get the right translator for you?

Our February special offer is Text Tutor for only £99 normally £300. Buy today and get 12 months unlimited use of Text Tutor.
To take advantage of this offer please contact us at info@emasuk.com or 0845 009 4939

Resources and tools to support you to talk to new arrivals or those whose first language is not English.

In recent Ofsted reports a number of schools that use EMAS UK have achieved ‘outstanding’ judgements and our revolutionary tools and resources have been highlighted as helping pupils achieve higher results than their peers nationally. They could all show how the pupil premium raised standards and achieved outstanding value for money.

If you have a number of EAL pupils and want resources and tools that will enable you to:

  • Communicate with them in their home language
  • Have them answer in English
  • Interview parents and carers
  • Have more effective targeting of pupils
  • Reduce disaffection through engagement
  • Have language specific work already prepared
  • Send letters home in the parent’s home language
  • Answer emails with the ease of a home language speaker
  • Use the same system as used      by Doctors and nurses in hospitals

Then talk to EMAS UK about how using their tools can make a positive difference.

Created by:

  • Teachers for teacher.
  • Classroom practitioners with years of EAL experience.
  • Utilising best practice and disseminating it.

For less than £500 a primary school can have award winning cover 24/7.

Now launching the newest tool in your pocket. The Talking App similar to Siri. It can be used by any iPad or tablet and works wherever you have 3G or Wi-Fi.

In an emergency situation EMASUK is invaluable

Benefits of the talking tools in A and E.  As A and E’s begin to use this system the following statement is becoming a very familiar statement .

In an emergency situation the talking tools are invaluable.

The reasons being given by doctors and nurses for this include the;

  • ease of access
  • availability without extra cost at weekends and through the nights
  • availability of phrasebook for those sentences frequently used which also sped up the process of triage, general form filling in and information gathering.
  • waiting for a translator/interpreter can be too long but this is when the online tool comes into its own.

There are many challenges ahead of all healthcare providers including the new CCG’s,  if you would like us to be part of your solution contact John via email j.foxwell@emasuk.com   or  phone  07525 323219.

Is real time translation here to stay?

I believe it is, otherwise how are we going to be able to communicate effectively with clients, customers or patients particularly when the price of asking a translator to attend and the time it takes can be both time and cost prohibitive, but also humane. Put yourself in the shoes of  the member of staff talking to the person from overseas access  when communication is difficult, everyone becomes stressed but using  a tried and  trusted resource like EMASUK and ClaireTalk that you can use at the touch of a button, rather than waiting or incurring expense will be the natural answer. It will reduce the stress of the communication difficulty for both the member of staff and the customer immediately, add this to the increased worrying stories that both translators and interpreters can be misinterpreting what the client is saying this can be the only safe way to get a real feel for the person and their needs. Many councils, police, businesses and NHS services as well as Education establishments around the world are now turning to these simple resources for increase their communication ability yet keep service levels the same or better with real cost savings.

See below the technological advancements in the world to date. I wonder what it will look like in one years time, much different I would suggest as advances march onwards. Those of you already using EMASUK and Clairetalk are the forerunners and the moulders of tomorrows translation services. EMASUK and Clairetalk offer a service using machine translation that differs because it has been specifically created for the Education and Health market. In Education it uses a revolutionary contextual engine that makes linguistic changes that would normally be made by a translator. It has a conversational recorder via a PDF printer this means that for the first time a school can have a record of the conversation in the home language of the speaker and English that can be kept as a permanent record. It can be used legally due to the time and date stamping involved when creating. In the health service ClaireTalk uses a bespoke phrasebook that allows medical professionals to have their most common questions, saying or phrases at their fingertips in fractions of a second. It also includes a YES/NO function that is graphically portrayed to allow those that have even the most basic educational background to respond with yes and no answers meaning that they can receive emergency treatment whilst perhaps a translator is being sought or the hospital wishes to explore the machine translation for their illness. The concepts behind these are equally at home in the Police, courts and business sectors using the translator can often mean that they put their own linguistical bend on wording for advertisements, flyers etc. Using Text tutor the company is directly in charge of the wording of their own literature and can tailor it to their audiences. If you want to know more contact us at www.emasuk.com.

 As a consequence multilingualism is fast  becoming a necessity, and hopefully we’ll one day be able to speak to anyone, in  any country, in any language, all in real-time.

The tech world is experiencing a surge in translation innovation. The  sector has been growing in relevance as persistent advancements in communication  technology continue to shrink our world. Major tech powers like Google and  Microsoft have increased their R&D spend on new translator technology,  culminating in an eye catching demo of an instant English-Chinese translator at a recent Microsoft  event.

The increased focus on translation is predicated by the prospective earnings  that can be reaped from the provision of machine-based solutions. Research firm Common Sense Advisory has estimated  that the global market of outsourced language services and technology will earn £21.1 billion in 2012. Furthermore, the proliferation of smartphones has  expanded the consumer base to an even greater extent, as demonstrated by the  Google Translate app’s recorded 50 million plus installs.

Hence the importance of persistent development in  speech translation, which according to Microsoft still offers a word error rate  of 20-25 per cent. Current iterations of the technology incorporate algorithms  that utilise ‘linguistic rules’ which are expressed via the common model of  matching a source word (in the native speaker’s language), to a corresponding  target word (in a chosen foreign language), with further processing via a  phonological corpus – a database that consists of the grammatical rules and  vocabulary of multiple languages – being required to place the words in  appropriate contextual order.

Google Translate

This is by far the most prolific mobile translation application, allowing for  text based translation in 65 languages and also providing real-time speech  translation for 17 languages (including English, Arabic, French and Dutch).

Its “conversation mode” was originally released in ALPHA last year and  currently remains an Android specific feature. The speech to speech function is  operated via a single handset, where the user is required to first pick both  native and foreign languages then after tapping the microphone icon, speak the  phrase to be translated. The application then speaks back the translated speech  and allows the foreign speaker to reply in their own language by doing the  same.

Ortsbo

This Canadian company provides a social networking solution to real time  translation by utilising plugins for most instant chat and messaging platforms  such as Windows Live, Google Talk and Facebook Chat. The user is only required  to select the output language and then begin typing in the chat box as they  normally would. This feature is also available in a free mobile app for both Android and iOS called Ortsbo 2GO.

Ortsbo can translate 53 global languages – including English, Chinese and  Arabic. The company also provides a Twitter service that allows its users to  place a widget that can pull tweets from a specific account or hash tag and  provide instant translation.

Ortsbo also provides a face to face solution in the form of its iPad and Windows Phone app, one2one, which much like Google translate  allows for two-way translation through the use of one device.

Vocre

MyLanguage’s Vocre application performs live translated video calling for iOS devices in 31 languages. The user dials out from within  the app and then is required to hit a record button before they speak into the  enabled mobile device and watch as their words are converted to text. After  making sure that the text entry is correct the user must then click reply and  the text is repeated in the chosen foreign language by a synthesised voice.

Much like Ortsbo and Google Translates mobile offerings the app gives face to  face functionality.

Hanashite Hon’yaku (automatic voice translation service)

Hanashite Hon’yaku is exclusive to Japan and more  specifically subscribers to the country’s largest network provider, NTT Docomo.  Much like Google Translate the service facilitates the use of face to face  translation through a single enabled mobile, what sets it apart however, is its  ability to translate actual phone conversations in real-time.

It provides spoken translation after a short pause as well as providing a  text transcript. The user is required to dial out via a provided smartphone  application, which allows for calls to be placed to overseas, mobile or  landline. The phone translations are being limited to Japanese, Korean, Chinese  and English, furthermore, by utilising cloud computing the accuracy of the  translations are not limited by a phones specification.

Lexifone

This Israeli start-up has foregone the app route in favour of a  dial up service that provides live call translations on any phone. The service  currently operates in 100 countries and can translate 15 languages and  dialects.

This is the only service I’ve listed that requires no Internet connection or  software install, the user must first dial an access number (found on the Lexifone site)  prior to dialing the call recipient. Much like the previously listed speech to  speech services, translation comes after a momentary pause as a tone signifies  when to begin talking. The service allows the listener to review the translation  in their own language before sending, thus ensuring the message is  accurate.

The company has deals in place with telecommunication titans BT Group  and Telefonica, providing Lexifone with Euro-wide coverage.

That is where the future of this technology lies and software giant Microsoft  believes the use of the speaker’s actual voice in translation is central to  this. At the aforementioned event held in China last month the computing  behemoth demoed its instant English to Mandarin translator with the spoken  translated output replicating the speaker’s voice and cadence.

French firm Alcatel – Lucent also hopes to launch a voice replicator called  MyVoice as a complement to its landline based translator WeTalk, which is a more  immediate sign of this technologies growth trajectory.

Thanks to breakthroughs in telecommunications, the world is becoming a  smaller place each and every day. As a consequence multilingualism is fast  becoming a necessity, and hopefully we’ll one day be able to speak to anyone, in  any country, in any language, all in real-time.

Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2012/12/11/real-time-translator-overview/#ixzz2Ejak0t6N

Vulnerable patients at a loss as to how they can communicate with their doctors.

What a sad story below and just the thing that we wanted to ensure doesn’t happen in the UK. In Australia interpreting services have been slashed leaving vulnerable people at a loss as to how they can speak with doctors. Many are just stuck for words whilst others are luckier if a member of their family can act as the interpreter.  Luckily in the UK this should not be a reality as we have Clairetalk the system that allows doctors and their patients to communicate with each other in real time without the need of an interpreter in the room.

Emina Suleiman, 81, said without a Turkish translator she could not communicate with hospital doctors.

“Because when I go to hospital, the doctor tell me something I not understand,” Mrs Suleiman said.

“Maybe now I not go. Nobody can help me there.”

I think this is everyone worst nightmare especially when thinking of older relatives. It is difficult for both sides, with the patients not being understood and the doctors doing their best but struggling.  I for one dont think this is acceptable when there are alternative cheap options available to make both peoples lives easier. Communication should not be a barrier but a tool to support both sides of the discussion.

To find out more go to www.emasuk.com and then choose the healthcare button.

To read the story here is the link http://whittlesea-leader.whereilive.com.au/news/story/translation-lost-in-cuts/

And the story:

THERE are mounting concerns that language services at The Northern Hospital have been slashed.

Northern Health chief executive Greg Pullen confirmed patients were now being screened to ensure interpreting services were necessary, but said the service would be maintained.

The State Opposition and the Association of Professional Engineers, Scientists and Managers Australia say there are already less casual and sessional translators across five Northern Health campuses.

Mr Pullen said full-time and part-time jobs would not be cut, but he did not say if casual translators or those on contracts would be affected.

Thomastown state Labor MP Bronwyn Halfpenny said direct pressure from the State Government to cut costs led to the service overhaul.

Ms Halfpenny said elderly migrants living in culturally diverse areas, such as Thomastown, would be the worst-affected.

“They rely heavily on interpreters to communicate effectively with their doctors,” Ms Halfpenny said.

“It is outrageous that people are being forced to rely on family members to translate for them in sensitive matters.”

Emina Suleiman, 81, said without a Turkish translator she could not communicate with hospital doctors.

“Because when I go to hospital, the doctor tell me something I not understand,” Mrs Suleiman said.

“Maybe now I not go. Nobody can help me there.”

Mrs Suleiman said she preferred not to burden her son, who already drove her to hospital, with translating duties.

Health Minister David Davis did not respond to the Leader’s questions.