EMASUK support World Book Day 6th March

World Book Day is a great opportunity to get young people excited about reading.

This year’s event takes place on Thursday 6 March, and the aim – as always – is to celebrate the power of storytelling and inspire a lifelong love of books.

If you are wondering how to get involved with EAL learners then try using Talking Tutor and the App to hear stories read aloud in English. Two Can Talk can be used to ask parents about stories from their country of origin. Why not invite them to read out a traditional story in assembly. You can always use Text Tutor to translate passages from famous books into English.

There are many reading-themed ideas to support our global citizens.

  • Pre-school children might like finger rhymes or acting out a favourite story. Make a picture book of the children’s drawings from the rhymes and let others read it aloud.
  • Primary students might enjoy organising a book swap or sharing stories from their early years. A class book-review book is a great way to inspire readers. Ask the local library if they have certificates for the number of reviews written. Look for some performance poetry and try it out with the children, a great poem to use is ‘Wriggle bum John’, it’s funny and has a great potential for movement.
  • Secondary pupils could have a book election to find their year group’s three favourite books of all time, or they could organise a sponsored event. Why not try performance poetry with different age groups, a firm favourite is

‘Mum used Pritt Stick,

instead of Lipstick,

then went and kissed my dad.

Two day passed,

both stuck fast,

longest snog they’ve ever had.’

There are lots of resources on the World Book day website  including assembly plans, posters, dressing up ideas and quizzes about World Book Day’s featured authors and illustrators (and their books, available for £1). They are: David Melling, Hello, Hugless Douglas!; Emily Gravett, Little Book Day Parade; Jim Smith, I Am Not a Loser; Jill Murphy, Fun with the Worst Witch; Lauren St John, The Midnight Picnic: A Laura Marlin Mystery; Terry Deary and Martin Brown, Horrible Histories: Terrible Trenches; James Patterson, Middle School: How I Got Lost in London; Sarah Lean, Jack Pepper; Robert Muchamore, Rock War: The Audition; and Maureen Johnson, The Boy in the Smoke.

Decorate your classroom for World Book Day with dual language text, EMAS UK has a range of books that can be used as posters or language mats. Their knowledge shares make ideal starting points for discussions about world stories. Ask the students to look at stories from around the world, translate extracts

Writing a book review is the focus of this lesson for students aged 11-14. The aim is to write a critical review of a substantial text, taking account of the context in which it was written and the likely impact on its intended readers. There is also the future reader to be considered, so writing for an audience should also be considered. Consider a reflective writing task in the form of a book review which encourages students to write about a text, taking account of the needs of others who might read it.

And finally, why not read Pip or for younger children use the picture book and ask them to tell their story using the pictures as a guide. See http://shop.emasuk.com/category/2612/pip_books for a list of the books available in many languages including picture only and English and hear what the creator has to say and ideas for teaching @

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frQVKGaMQSM&feature=youtu.be

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Using Bilingual books can support children with one English spekaing parent.

September seems a long way away and teachers have not even started their holidays yet.  Many will be planning vigorously for their September classes just before going for a well earned break. One thing that should be on their minds especially if they know of new arrivals to their classes the language of learning their children have experienced prior to arriving in their classroom.

For myself this story struck  chord with me

On a sunny day in London, when the streets are crowded with people enjoying the rare warmth, you can hear an abundance of different languages from the majority migrant groups in the city: families discussing the school day in Somali; teenagers gossiping in Turkish; imams greeting each other in Urdu.   But passing by the shop fronts boasting posters in languages from Polish and Bengali, you won’t hear German or Cape Verdean creole – not unless you go to Andrea and Xaxa’s for tea and cake.http://blog.languagelizard.com/2013/04/15/bringing-up-multilingual-children-with-less-common-home-languages/

The reason being that  few years ago, I was not only planning for my new classes but also my daughters when moving from Wales to London.  What disappointed me the most was that although I thought about my new classes language of prior learning, the teachers at my daughters school did not reciprocate. Up until this time she has been taught her academic learning in Welsh so although verbally adept in English her academic language did not match. What did make me cross was that I worked very hard at the end of my first year creating and supporting the creation of resources via the Local Authority for my classes in Greek, Turkish, Bengali and Urdu but nothing was ever created to support her.  In parent discussions when asked about how they are helping they could tell you how to help others similar to the stories above but as this was readily available and to hand they never went the extra mile to support those other pupils with English as their second or third language.

In an effort to support as many languages as possible and because of the sheer wrench it can be to move house within a village, without from Wales to England or indeed from any other country in the world we asked Shoofly to support us in creating  book about feelings and loss.  The book is called Pip and can be used with parents particularly if only one parent speaks English as it will have the text in English plus e.g. German.  To support teachers and the pupils further in a PSHE role with it is a great software programme that allows you to put Pip into a story, recreate a story or create your own story. using your own words and pictures or from the dedicated library of images and words.

If you would like to support these children each book is £20.00 but via this blog on offer until 1st September for only  £15.00 per book (excluding p and p)  and is currently available in the following:

picture format only, English, Polish, Albanian, Chinese Mandarin, Czech, Dutch, Russian, French, German, Nepali, Kurdish, Hungarian, Norwegian, Hebrew, Latvian, Cantonese, Romanian, Somali and Lithuanian.

Pip Story Creator – £100. http://shop.emasuk.com/site_content/site_emasuk/resources/pip-order.pdf for bulk orders.

 

Quote Blog to receive your discount to either info@emasuk.com or in person to 0845 0094939.

Give all of your children a chance.