Do we put too much trust in people we don’t really know?

Do we put too much trust in people we don’t really know?

Sometimes we place our total reliance on communication through individuals that have little or no more qualifications than having been born with parents that speak a second or different home language. Yet we are putting these people in places of great sensitivity with issues of security, medical understanding and levels of education far exceeding those of English speaking staff and we expect them to translate it accurately without first knowing that they understand the words themselves. Being able to speak a second language doesn’t mean that your level of education is any higher or your skills any better, it just means that you are able to talk and communicate.

With EMASUK talking tools you are able to take away the guesswork of what is being said, present it sensitively and with compassion, and make eye contact using the correct body language to show that you care, you understand, that its urgent, that sometimes there is no choice, but all the time you are in command.
With this happening it means that for the first time ever via our unique product every person is communicable to by professionals even in the darkest hours of their lives.

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/nhs-interpreter-charged-twice-services-6905242. This story is happening far too commonly in UK schools, hospitals, police forces and courts using on-line tools this can all be stopped, it can be checked and even if you use a translator for it it gives you that support and back up that you feel confident that they know what they are doing.
Last year we highlighted some of the concerns in the blog @http://wp.me/p2LCCD-fc

Find out how you can use this service with a Microsoft surface to support you in reducing costs but maintain a high level of customer satisfaction and service by contact Ewan on E.Macgregor@emasuk.com or call 07595 021 958.

 

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English is not the first language for one in nine schools

 
Communicate across languages with EMASUK

Did anyone see the ITV story last week that English is not the first language for one in nine schools?

http://www.itv.com/news/story/2014-02-01/english-is-not-the-first-language-for-one-in-nine-schools/

To be honest despite visiting schools all over the UK I didn’t realise it was so high. It was interesting that Douglas Carswell, a backbench Tory MP has called for a “national debate about the impact of social cohesion in Britain today.”

At EMASUK, ‘ replies John Foxwell,’ we have been working for the last five years to support schools to work within their communities and develop home school partnerships that effectively create community cohesion. We have done this by developing a revolutionary speaking translator that communicates in 25 languages and allows the community member to be in charge of their own interaction.

Communicate across languages with EMASUK SMT's

For example picking up an English document, translating into Polish, being able to respond in Polish that is then translated into English means that the emphasis is placed firmly on the user. We welcome the opportunity to open the debate up and show how it isn’t community cohesion that is the issue it is community communication.

Join the debate. What do you think?

The world is in your hands.

The world is in your hands.

Resources and tools to support you to talk to new arrivals or those whose first language is not English.

In recent Ofsted reports a number of schools that use EMAS UK have achieved ‘outstanding’ judgements and our revolutionary tools and resources have been highlighted as helping pupils achieve higher results than their peers nationally. They could all show how the pupil premium raised standards and achieved outstanding value for money.

If you have a number of EAL pupils and want resources and tools that will enable you to:

  • Communicate with them in their home language
  • Have them answer in English
  • Interview parents and carers
  • Have more effective targeting of pupils
  • Reduce disaffection through engagement
  • Have language specific work already prepared
  • Send letters home in the parent’s home language
  • Answer emails with the ease of a home language speaker
  • Use the same system as used      by Doctors and nurses in hospitals

Then talk to EMAS UK about how using their tools can make a positive difference.

Created by:

  • Teachers for teacher.
  • Classroom practitioners with years of EAL experience.
  • Utilising best practice and disseminating it.

For less than £500 a primary school can have award winning cover 24/7.

Now launching the newest tool in your pocket. The Talking App similar to Siri. It can be used by any iPad or tablet and works wherever you have 3G or Wi-Fi.

September 2013 – OFSTED subsidary guidance EMASUK Keeping you up-to-date

In September a few things are changing for schools and OFSTED guidance for inspectors change accordingly.  To find the information http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/subsidiary-guidance-supporting-inspection-of-maintained-schools-and-academies or see a summary of some of the points below. The biggest challenge will be the disapplication of the National Curriculum in the UK and the use of Pupil Premium.

Disapplication of the National Curriculum

  1. The majority of the national curriculum is being ‘disapplied’ (ie suspended) from September 2013 for one year for most subjects to give all schools the freedom to change what they teach in order to prepare for the new national curriculum. Disapplication is a suspension of the content of the national curriculum, not the subjects themselves. New statutory programmes of study will be introduced for all subjects from 2014 (2015 for Key Stage 4 English, maths and science) – with the addition of foreign languages at Key Stage 2. ICT will be renamed computing.
  2. Whilst schools will still have to teach all national curriculum subjects, what they cover will be up to them. The intention is to help teachers to manage the transition from the old national curriculum to the new one.  For example, teachers can stick broadly to the current national curriculum but will be able to vary when they teach topics and what topics they teach. They can use this freedom to cover any gaps in pupils’ knowledge and understanding to make sure they are prepared to learn the new curriculum from 2014.
  3. Disapplication is a permissive measure – no school will be required to change its curriculum in 2013/14. At Key Stage 4 for English, mathematics and science the freedom will last for two academic years because the new national curriculum will be taught from 2015/16 for those pupils. Teachers will still have to teach the national curriculum for English, maths and science to pupils in years 1, 2, 5 and 6 in 2013/14.  This is to ensure that pupils are properly prepared for national curriculum tests at Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 in summer 2014.

Evaluating the school’s use of the pupil premium

  1. It is for schools to decide how the pupil premium is spent. However, they are accountable for their use of this funding. Since September 2012, schools have been required to publish online information about their pupil premium allocation and how they plan to spend it this year. They must also publish a statement of how they spent the money for the previous year and its impact on the attainment of pupils eligible for support through the pupil premium. This is intended to ensure that parents and others are made fully aware of the impact on the attainment of pupils covered by the pupil premium.
  2. Local authorities decide how to allocate the pupil premium for pupils from low-income families in non-mainstream settings. The local authority must consult non-mainstream settings about how the premium for these pupils should be used.
  3. When evaluating the effectiveness of leaders, managers and governors, inspectors should gather evidence about the use of the pupil premium in relation to the following key issues:

1. the level of pupil premium funding received by the school in the current academic year and levels of funding received in previous academic years

2. how the school has spent the pupil premium and why it has decided to spend it in the way it has

3. any differences made to the learning and progress of pupils eligible for the pupil premium as shown by performance data and inspection evidence.


[1]The pupil premium is specific, additional funding provided to support the education of pupils known to be eligible for free school meals, pupils who have been eligible for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years (known as the Ever6 free school meal measure), children who have been looked after continuously for a period of 6 months and children whose parents are currently serving in the armed forces. See http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/pupilsupport/premium/a0076063/pp for further information.

Impact of pupil premium and Year 7 catch-up

  1. Inspectors must consider the difference between the average points scores in each of English and mathematics in national assessments at the end of Key Stage 2, and at GCSE at the end of Key Stage 4, for the following groups:

those pupils known to be eligible for free school meals and all other pupils (FSM and non-FSM pupils)

children who are looked after and all other pupils (CLA and non-CLA)

children of service families and all other pupils. (This information is not contained in RAISEonline but inspectors will expect schools to provide it during the inspection.)

  1. Inspectors must evaluate the performance in English and in mathematics of groups of pupils who are supported through the pupil premium. Where a gap is identified between the performance of pupils supported through the pupil premium and all others in the school, inspectors must report this and whether it is narrowing. They should express gaps in terms of National Curriculum levels or a period of time (such as ‘two terms’) at the end of Key Stage 2, or GCSE grades at the end of Key Stage 4.
  2. The following table shows suitable ways of expressing gaps in average points scores using plain language and simple fractions, which should be reported in words. Inspectors should take into account the way in which the school divides up the school year, such as into terms, in selecting wording that readers will understand.
points

1

1.5

2

3

4

4.5

5

6

Key Stage 2
NC levels

1/4

1/3

1/2

2/3

3/4

1

terms (3 per year)

1

2

3

4

5

6

years

1/3

1/2

2/3

1

11/2

2

months

4

6

8

12

16

18

20

24

 

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 4

 

 

 

 

 

GCSE grades

1/4

1/3

1/2

2/3

3/4

1

  1. Inspectors must also evaluate and report on the progress being made by pupils targeted for the Year 7 catch-up programme, including through analysis of summary data kept by the school.[1]

[1] This programme is for pupils who did not achieve the expected Level 4 in either reading or mathematics at the end of Key Stage 2. http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/pupilsupport/year7catchup/a00216777/y7-catch-up-premium-faq

Pupils’ cultural development is shown by their:

understanding and appreciation of the wide range of cultural influences that have shaped their own heritage

willingness to participate in, and respond to, for example, artistic, musical, sporting, mathematical, technological, scientific and cultural opportunities

interest in exploring, understanding of, and respect for cultural diversity and the extent to which they understand, accept, respect and celebrate diversity, as shown by their attitudes towards different religious, ethnic and socio-economic groups in the local, national and global communities.

December Free E-zine – Baptists, Israel, Quiz, Recipes, Primary Language Awards and Experiential Learning article – Get yours now.

The  December E-Zine is now available.  Members find it in your inbox.

Headlines for this month includes:

  • An article about experiential learning,
  • Israel is the country of the month,
  • Primary Language Awards – Enter now
  • A report on a visit to Jerusalem,
  • the January faith calendar,  and
  • the religion of the month Baptism.

 

There is also a quiz, recipes for chicken soup and falafel and the free resource is a science resource the anatomy of a plant in Arabic.

If you haven’t got yours just email d.mills@emasuk.com and ask to be put on the free monthly E-zine list giving your name, email and address as well as your school or business name.