EMASUK resources and tools- a new, inclusive and equitable approach to linguistic diversity

Multilingualism, far from being a problem, can be part of the solution to Europe’s current impasse: multilingual people are better at multitasking, are more creative and innovative; multilingual people have a greater capacity for being open-minded and perceptive; multilingual people are a more mobile workforce and often obtain better-paid jobs. To sum therefore, multilingual people are better-equipped for the challenges of today’s world! 

That is why we have created resources and tools to support you whatever your workforce turnover or needs.

Hospitals never know the nationality of their next patient or their spoken language but they need sometimes act quickly to make the patient better.

Councils also never know the nationality of their next customer/client yet still have to communicate. This can prove to be costly not only financially but in time waiting for someone to help and the patience of the two people invoved.

Business leaders trade over many borders through different languages but cannot expect to be fluent themselves in every langauge that they wish to engage in.

Make you and your team multilingual with the touch of a button and our ward winning TWO CAN TALK software.

See the website or contact us on info@emasuk.com

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Happy Easter

Happy Easter Everyone

Happy Easter Everyone

 

Happy Easter to those who celebrate this religious custom
Afrikaans     Geseënde Paasfees
Albanian     Gëzuar Pashkët
Alsatian     Frohe Ostern
Amharic     መልካም ፋሲካ (me’elkam fasika)
Assyrian     Ghyamta d’maran hoya brikhta
Azeri     Pasxa bayramınız müqəddəs olsun
Basque     Ondo izan Bazko garaian’
Bengali     ঈস্টর এর শুভেচ্ছা নেবেন।
Bhojpuri     शुभ ईस्टर
Breton     Pask Seder
Bulgarian     Христос Воскресе  Christ has risen
Воистина Воскресе  Truly, he has risen – reply
Честит Великден
Catalan     Bona Pasqua
Chamorro     Felis Påsgua
Cherokee     ᏥᏌ ᏕᎴᎯᏌᏅ
Cantonese)     復活節快樂
Cornish     Pask Lowen
Corsican     Bona Pasqua
Croatian     Sretan Uskrs
Czech     Veselé Velikonoce
Danish     God påske
Dutch    Vrolijk Pasen!

Esperanto     Feliĉan Paskon
Estonian     Häid lihavõttepühi
Faroese     Gleðilig páskir
Fijian     Vanuinui vinaka ni Siga ni Mate
Finnish     Hyvää Pääsiäistä / Iloista pääsiäistä
French     Joyeuses Pâques
Frisian (North)     Fröiliken poosche
Frisian (West)     Lokkich Peaske
Friulian     Buine Pasche
Galician     Boas Pascuas
German     Frohe Ostern
Greek (Modern)     Καλό πάσχα
Χριστός ανέστη! (Hristós anésti) – Christ has Risen
Αληθώς ανέστη! (Alithós anésti) – Truly he has Risen (reply)
Haitian Creole     Bònn fèt pak
Hebrew     (chag pascha same’ach) חג פסחא שמח
Hindi     शुभ ईस्टर (śubh īsṭar)
Hungarian     Kellemes Húsvéti Ünnepeket! (Pleasant Easter Holidays!)
Áldott Húsvétot kívánok! (Wishing You a Blessed Easter!)
Icelandic     Gleðilega páska
Indonesian     Selamat Paskah
Irish (Gaelic)     Cáisc Shona Dhuit / Dhaoibh, Beannachtaí na Cásca
Italian     Buona Pasqua
Jèrriais     Jouaiyeux Pâques
Kannada     ಈಸ್ಟರ್ ಹಬ್ಬದ ಶುಭಾಷಯಗಳು
Khmer     រីករាយថ្ងៃបុណ្យប៉ាក
Kinyarwanda     Pasika Nziza
Korean     행복한 부활절이 되시길
Latin     Prospera Pascha sit
Latvian     Priecīgas Lieldienas
Luxembourgish     Schéin Ouschteren
Malayalam     ഈസ്റ്റര്‍ ആശംസകള്‍!
Maltese     L-Għid it-tajjeb
Manx (Gaelic)     Caisht sonney dhyt
Māori     Ngā mihi o te Aranga
Marathi     शुभ ईस्टर (śubh īsṭar)
Norwegian     God påske
Occitan     Bonas Pascas
Papiamento     Bon pasco
Pashto     ښه او خوشحال اختر
Persian (Farsi) عيد پاک مبارک
Polish     Wesołych Świąt Wielkanocnych!
Wesołego Alleluja!
Szczęśliwej Wielkanocy!
Wesołych Świąt Wielkiej Nocy!
Portuguese     Boa Páscoa, Páscoa Feliz
Portuguese (Brazilian)     Boa Páscoa!
Páscoa Feliz!
Punjabi     ਈਸਟਰ ਖੁਸ਼ਿਯਾੰਵਾਲਾ ਹੋਵੇ (īsṭar khuśyāṅvālā hove)
Romanian     Paşte Fericit
Russian     Христос воскрес – Christ resurrected
Воистину воскрес (Voistinu voskres) – reply – truly resurrected
Samoan     Ia manuia le Eseta
Sardinian(Logudorese)     Bona pasca
Scottish Gaelic     A’ Chàisg sona
Serbian     Христос васкрсе (Hristos vaskrse) – Christ resurrected
Ваистину васкрсе (Vaistina vaskrse) – truly resurrected (reply)
Sicilian     Bona Pasqua
Sinhala     සුභ පාස්කුවක්
Slovak     Veselé prežitie Veľkonočných sviatkov
Slovenian     Vesele velikonočne praznike
Spanish     ¡Felices Pascuas!
Swahili     Heri kwa sikukuu ya Pasaka
Swedish     Glad Påsk
Swiss German     Schöni Oschtere
Tagalog     Maligayang pasko ng pagkabuhay
Tamil     ஈஸ்ட்டர் நல்வாழ்த்துக்கள்
Telugu     శుభ ఈస్ఠర్ (shubha eestar)
Tetum     Feliz Paskua
Thai     สุขสันต์วันอีสเตอร์
Tibetan     ཡི་ཤུ་བསྐྱར་གསོའི་དུས་ཆེན་ལ་བཀྲ་ཤིས་བདེ་ལེགས་ཞུ།
Tigrinya     ርሑስ በዓል ፋሲካ። (Rhus Be’al Fasika)
Tok Pisin     Hepi ista
Tongan     Ma’u ha ‘aho Pekia fiefia.
Tsotsil     Lek me ech’an ti ta k’uxul orae
Tswana     Malatsi a paseka aa itumedisang
Turkish     Paskalya bayramınız kutlu olsun
Ukrainian     Христос Воскрес! Christ is Risen!
Venetian     Bona Pasqua
Vietnamese     Chúc Mừng Phục Sinh
Volapük     Lesustanazäli yofik
Võro     Hüvvi munnõpühhi
Welsh     Pasg Hapus
Yorùbá     Ẹ ku Ayọ Ajinde
Zulu     IPhasika elijabulayo / IPhasika elithokozayo

EMASUK support World Book Day 6th March

World Book Day is a great opportunity to get young people excited about reading.

This year’s event takes place on Thursday 6 March, and the aim – as always – is to celebrate the power of storytelling and inspire a lifelong love of books.

If you are wondering how to get involved with EAL learners then try using Talking Tutor and the App to hear stories read aloud in English. Two Can Talk can be used to ask parents about stories from their country of origin. Why not invite them to read out a traditional story in assembly. You can always use Text Tutor to translate passages from famous books into English.

There are many reading-themed ideas to support our global citizens.

  • Pre-school children might like finger rhymes or acting out a favourite story. Make a picture book of the children’s drawings from the rhymes and let others read it aloud.
  • Primary students might enjoy organising a book swap or sharing stories from their early years. A class book-review book is a great way to inspire readers. Ask the local library if they have certificates for the number of reviews written. Look for some performance poetry and try it out with the children, a great poem to use is ‘Wriggle bum John’, it’s funny and has a great potential for movement.
  • Secondary pupils could have a book election to find their year group’s three favourite books of all time, or they could organise a sponsored event. Why not try performance poetry with different age groups, a firm favourite is

‘Mum used Pritt Stick,

instead of Lipstick,

then went and kissed my dad.

Two day passed,

both stuck fast,

longest snog they’ve ever had.’

There are lots of resources on the World Book day website  including assembly plans, posters, dressing up ideas and quizzes about World Book Day’s featured authors and illustrators (and their books, available for £1). They are: David Melling, Hello, Hugless Douglas!; Emily Gravett, Little Book Day Parade; Jim Smith, I Am Not a Loser; Jill Murphy, Fun with the Worst Witch; Lauren St John, The Midnight Picnic: A Laura Marlin Mystery; Terry Deary and Martin Brown, Horrible Histories: Terrible Trenches; James Patterson, Middle School: How I Got Lost in London; Sarah Lean, Jack Pepper; Robert Muchamore, Rock War: The Audition; and Maureen Johnson, The Boy in the Smoke.

Decorate your classroom for World Book Day with dual language text, EMAS UK has a range of books that can be used as posters or language mats. Their knowledge shares make ideal starting points for discussions about world stories. Ask the students to look at stories from around the world, translate extracts

Writing a book review is the focus of this lesson for students aged 11-14. The aim is to write a critical review of a substantial text, taking account of the context in which it was written and the likely impact on its intended readers. There is also the future reader to be considered, so writing for an audience should also be considered. Consider a reflective writing task in the form of a book review which encourages students to write about a text, taking account of the needs of others who might read it.

And finally, why not read Pip or for younger children use the picture book and ask them to tell their story using the pictures as a guide. See http://shop.emasuk.com/category/2612/pip_books for a list of the books available in many languages including picture only and English and hear what the creator has to say and ideas for teaching @

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frQVKGaMQSM&feature=youtu.be

My child’s amazing bilingual abilities and skills are not valued, used or developed in English-only school

This was piece recently that I read in the Guardian what do you think?

My child’s amazing bilingual abilities and skills are not valued, used or developed in his English-only school.”

The Government can point to a growth in the number of bilingual primary schools as a result of its free school programme – there are French, German and Spanish schools in operation.

In addition, it is making languages compulsory from the age of seven in state primary schools for the first time ever from next September.

However, such actions are too little, Ms Gavrilova feels. “Our children are set to grow up in a world where their sense of normality is very different from ours,” says the brochure outlining its plans. “Their ability to adapt and adjust will be the difference between success and failure.

“It’s why the behemoth of the British education system is increasingly not the answer to our children’s needs.”

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/teaching-in-tongues-the-bilingual-preschool-tapping-new-potential-9032047.html

But what do you think?

I think schools delivering bilingual opportunities are valuing their learners and parents culture.  It from the first language that the second language is learnt and developed. It is only done much quicker than the traditional methods used as the young people brains are wired differently so they can translate easier and quicker across language using the technologies available to them to support their language acquisition. But what are your views?

If you would like more information on the tools and resources we have available to make your job easier when communicating with children or parents then contact us at www.emasuk.com or info@emasuk.com 0845 009 4939 Thanks Liz

This months New Resource Sheets

Designed to be a starting point for schools when they have new arrivals before personalisation can happen using the talking tools the resource vault is an invaluable resource. This month we have uploaded to the Education resource vault.

Continents Poster for Geography in Bengali, Chinese Cantonese, Chinese Mandarin, Dutch, English, French, German, Gujarati, Hebrew, Italian, Kurdish, Latvian, Nepali, Romanian, Slovak, Somali, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu

Food Chains producers to consumers – a poster showing the different types of producers and consumers for learning in science arenas. These can now be found in the resource vault choose by subject, then choose Science and look for the languages you need or alternatively choose one of the languages below and find it under Food chains producers to consumers. The languages are; Bengali, Chinese Cantonese, Chinese Mandarin, Czech, Dutch, English, French, German, Gujarati, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Kurdish, Latvian, Lithuanian, Malay, Nepali, Norwegian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Somali, Spanish, Turkish and Urdu.

Human Body Workbook – A workbook for teachers to choose the pages that are relevant to them spanning various levels and depth. Ideal for Science and PE with posters and activities to complete. The first languages available are Latvian, Polish, Urdu.

Maths resource sheets – a small booklet showing maths basics shapes and number in the following languages; Bengali, Cornish, Estonian, Finnish, Romanian, Slovak, Slovene and Welsh.

Welcome Booklet – great for new arrivals for teachers to personalise by using the pages suitable for their school. Starting with the school details and times, information about the staff and a timetable, School uniform with a choice of colours red, blue, green and yellow. It moves onto the PE Kit, Food in school and eating healthily and safety information. New languages uploaded are; Chinese Cantonese, Chinese Mandarin, Hungarian, Kurdish, Italian, Norwegian, Polish, Russian, Turkish and Urdu. They can be found under PSHE

Storyboards for literacy – a mix of rhymes to support children’s literacy development in two more additional languages German and Latvian can now be found in the PSHE part of the resource vault.

And finally Environment types for Geography in Gujarati to complement the other languages already available.

Get all these and more for £129.00 per year.  No additional payments for monthly updates.

Contact us at info@emasuk.com or 0845 009 4939 for more details or current offers.

Supporting EAL learners – Literacy activity for small groups

Choose a book to read. Pip is a great one to start with.

Work out which words the children will need to understand the story.

Pre teach these words. Use two can Talk, talking tutor or the hand held to engage and ensure greater understanding.

Read the book

After reading ensure understanding and embedding of relevant words to do this.

Organise the group into smaller groups of three to five learners.

Give each child a discussion type question to ask the group that they are in.

Encourage reading out aloud of the question.

Number each group member i.e. groups of three number 1-3. Ask Number 1 to read the question and No2 to make a comment about the question and invite discussion via all 3. when that finished no 2 to read out their question, No 3 to comment etc. until all group members have had their say.

Make necessary adjustments depending on the groups needs e.g. for those whose language is limited.

Using Bilingual books can support children with one English spekaing parent.

September seems a long way away and teachers have not even started their holidays yet.  Many will be planning vigorously for their September classes just before going for a well earned break. One thing that should be on their minds especially if they know of new arrivals to their classes the language of learning their children have experienced prior to arriving in their classroom.

For myself this story struck  chord with me

On a sunny day in London, when the streets are crowded with people enjoying the rare warmth, you can hear an abundance of different languages from the majority migrant groups in the city: families discussing the school day in Somali; teenagers gossiping in Turkish; imams greeting each other in Urdu.   But passing by the shop fronts boasting posters in languages from Polish and Bengali, you won’t hear German or Cape Verdean creole – not unless you go to Andrea and Xaxa’s for tea and cake.http://blog.languagelizard.com/2013/04/15/bringing-up-multilingual-children-with-less-common-home-languages/

The reason being that  few years ago, I was not only planning for my new classes but also my daughters when moving from Wales to London.  What disappointed me the most was that although I thought about my new classes language of prior learning, the teachers at my daughters school did not reciprocate. Up until this time she has been taught her academic learning in Welsh so although verbally adept in English her academic language did not match. What did make me cross was that I worked very hard at the end of my first year creating and supporting the creation of resources via the Local Authority for my classes in Greek, Turkish, Bengali and Urdu but nothing was ever created to support her.  In parent discussions when asked about how they are helping they could tell you how to help others similar to the stories above but as this was readily available and to hand they never went the extra mile to support those other pupils with English as their second or third language.

In an effort to support as many languages as possible and because of the sheer wrench it can be to move house within a village, without from Wales to England or indeed from any other country in the world we asked Shoofly to support us in creating  book about feelings and loss.  The book is called Pip and can be used with parents particularly if only one parent speaks English as it will have the text in English plus e.g. German.  To support teachers and the pupils further in a PSHE role with it is a great software programme that allows you to put Pip into a story, recreate a story or create your own story. using your own words and pictures or from the dedicated library of images and words.

If you would like to support these children each book is £20.00 but via this blog on offer until 1st September for only  £15.00 per book (excluding p and p)  and is currently available in the following:

picture format only, English, Polish, Albanian, Chinese Mandarin, Czech, Dutch, Russian, French, German, Nepali, Kurdish, Hungarian, Norwegian, Hebrew, Latvian, Cantonese, Romanian, Somali and Lithuanian.

Pip Story Creator – £100. http://shop.emasuk.com/site_content/site_emasuk/resources/pip-order.pdf for bulk orders.

 

Quote Blog to receive your discount to either info@emasuk.com or in person to 0845 0094939.

Give all of your children a chance.