Because YOU need value for money and real results fast!

Because YOU need value for money and real results fast we have spent a lot of time looking at a new ways to helps normal everyday individuals, who are not linguists, converse with patients, clients, customers, parents and learners.

Our society is changing, states a recent press article We have tweaked some of the definitions associated with “predictable” terms.

This got me thinking as often it is the linguists, new arrivals, diversity and equality units that speak to us despite being able to speak many languages themselves and often cannot see it from the non-linguists point of view e.g. when there is no one available yet they still need to communicate with someone.

“Accuracy” is a good example. Before, we might have defined “accuracy” as “a thorough process including quality assurance, fact checking and overall correctness.”

The modern day definition of accuracy might come with a contextual caveat, though–“a thorough process including quality assurance, fact checking and overall correctness as time allows.”

In journalism, this digital age change is often referred to as the dilemma between accuracy and immediacy–is it more important to inform the public right away and risk inaccuracy, or take more time to provide an accurate product?

I think this is probably true of  communication and not just journalism, as we all move around more and access information from further afield. Hence the need to be more able ourselves to be proficient in getting what we need translated to the best accuracy possible within the timelimits given. For example – If its in the middle of the night when there is no person available, or for areas where it is too costly to have a person or where you need answers to question immediately, e.g. at Accident and Emergency, local disaster or accident we offer solutions to support those on the scene.

The article also suggests ways to ensure that the translations you receive are not only delivered in a quality, timely manner, but also with accurate meaning.

Clients, especially in the area of life sciences, often inquire about accuracy assurance. “OK, we’ve received our translation and it looks great, but how do we ensure that it is accurate?” they ask.

Know who you hired. You can avoid the retroactivity and second guessing that may come after delivery if you have conducted a thorough language service provider search before you even have anything translated. – At EMASUK our written material i.e. resource library and books, is supported with a wealth of translators that work in schools, hospitals or social services to ensure that they are accurately reflected in up to date workplace situations.

Be willing to provide support. There will be fewer issues with terminology if you either provide your translation service with previously translated materials (the quality of which you like) or request that a glossary is prepared and approved before translation begins. Appoint someone in your organization who will be available to consult with the translators, explain a term or the ins- and outs- of a process. – At EMASUK we always work with the organisation to provide as much personalised support as possible but also develop tools and resources to allow  individuals to support themselves in emergency or day to day activities that are generally unaccountable for.

Back-translation as a verification tool. Many users of translation services still verify translation using back-translation. It is usually the case in case of products subject to compliance verification or certification (FDA, IRB, etc.). Your translation provider should know how to ensure the independence and objectivity of such process. Alternately, you might request assistance of a third-party service.- At EMASUK the technological translation tools themselves have reverse translation buttons allowing you to check it out for yourself in seconds.

Value accuracy. If you’re reading this, chances are you already think accuracy is important. When we suggest that you “value” accuracy, we are really saying, “do not buy into the idea that you have to sacrifice accuracy for immediacy.” The two are not mutually exclusive; actually, they can be partners, depending on the definition of immediacy. If by “immediacy,” one means ” a matter of hours,” there is a chance that accuracy could suffer. If “immediacy” means “a couple days,” accuracy will likely thrive, especially when prioritized.- Much as I agree with that there are times when accuracy needs to be sacrificed for the people involved just to communicate for example where a person is bleeding profusely, at an accident site, or in schools where teachers need to take charge of an incident. That is why at EMASUK we have developed an innovative 22nd Century model which uses technology for immediacy, and written people translated text for books and written resources.

 

http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1829510

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SME’s do you need value for money tools that support you to communicate with your clients?

Most small businesses struggle to find interpreters and translators not because they don’t want to but because they are not aware of what is available, or do not have the flexibility in their cash flow to allow them to secure the right person at the right time.  Unless the business revolves around languages then buying in expertise or a member of staff is not within their grasp. In reality we cannot all be linguists but we do need to be able to bridge the gap to communicate.

With our tools and resources you can easily communicate, with a set yearly charge (no hidden extras), available all day every day, day or night, at your fingertips.

Communicate across languages with EMASUK SMT's

Communicate across languages

Available as an app or on a tablet there are versions available for platforms including Apple, androids, Kindle fire and tablets.

To find out more contact us on 0845 009 4939 or info@emasuk.com Ask for your free phone walk through of how we can support you to communicate with your customers.

 

How to use EMASUK’s Talking Tools

Just recently people in the education world have been asking for  a brief rundown of how the Talking Tools (Talking Tutor, Text Tutor and Two Can Talk) work and their best uses. Many are really surprised at how easy it is to use and access and say ‘it really is as simple as typing in’.  Accessible 24/7 wherever you are this makes it a value for money solution.

So we have created this poster for your walls or to use in training situations or review demonstrations.

NB in Health, Business and Public services ClaireTalk although bespoke is similar to Talking Tutor.

Using Talking Tools

Using Talking Tools

If you have any other ideas please let us know.

If you would like a digital copy of this poster contact us at info@emasuk.com.

Court interpreter investigated after being heard ‘coaching a witness’

See this News Report @ – http://swns.com/news/court-interpreter-investigated-heard-coaching-witness-35017/

The Tamil translator has been accused of egging on a grievous bodily harm witness before he resumed giving evidence at Ipswich Crown Court on April 30.

Translation services seem to be forever in the headlines especially when they go wrong.  How can you be sure and trust the tools, people and equipment that you use to support you in the translator/interpreter role?

EMASUK Two Can Talk and Claire Talk has a unique feature that allows you to reverse the translation enabling you to have trust in the words that you are communicating. Being able to use the talking technology can cut down on the cost of translation services allowing you to employ translators or interpreters to better suit your needs and requirements and to get the most out of their skills.

As above if the courts and the judicial service had used the talking technologies in initial interviews, communicating using I can Talk to when on the move they could hire the best and their trusted interpreters to ensure that our judicial system doesn’t become costly as well as greatly undermined.

Is real time translation here to stay?

I believe it is, otherwise how are we going to be able to communicate effectively with clients, customers or patients particularly when the price of asking a translator to attend and the time it takes can be both time and cost prohibitive, but also humane. Put yourself in the shoes of  the member of staff talking to the person from overseas access  when communication is difficult, everyone becomes stressed but using  a tried and  trusted resource like EMASUK and ClaireTalk that you can use at the touch of a button, rather than waiting or incurring expense will be the natural answer. It will reduce the stress of the communication difficulty for both the member of staff and the customer immediately, add this to the increased worrying stories that both translators and interpreters can be misinterpreting what the client is saying this can be the only safe way to get a real feel for the person and their needs. Many councils, police, businesses and NHS services as well as Education establishments around the world are now turning to these simple resources for increase their communication ability yet keep service levels the same or better with real cost savings.

See below the technological advancements in the world to date. I wonder what it will look like in one years time, much different I would suggest as advances march onwards. Those of you already using EMASUK and Clairetalk are the forerunners and the moulders of tomorrows translation services. EMASUK and Clairetalk offer a service using machine translation that differs because it has been specifically created for the Education and Health market. In Education it uses a revolutionary contextual engine that makes linguistic changes that would normally be made by a translator. It has a conversational recorder via a PDF printer this means that for the first time a school can have a record of the conversation in the home language of the speaker and English that can be kept as a permanent record. It can be used legally due to the time and date stamping involved when creating. In the health service ClaireTalk uses a bespoke phrasebook that allows medical professionals to have their most common questions, saying or phrases at their fingertips in fractions of a second. It also includes a YES/NO function that is graphically portrayed to allow those that have even the most basic educational background to respond with yes and no answers meaning that they can receive emergency treatment whilst perhaps a translator is being sought or the hospital wishes to explore the machine translation for their illness. The concepts behind these are equally at home in the Police, courts and business sectors using the translator can often mean that they put their own linguistical bend on wording for advertisements, flyers etc. Using Text tutor the company is directly in charge of the wording of their own literature and can tailor it to their audiences. If you want to know more contact us at www.emasuk.com.

 As a consequence multilingualism is fast  becoming a necessity, and hopefully we’ll one day be able to speak to anyone, in  any country, in any language, all in real-time.

The tech world is experiencing a surge in translation innovation. The  sector has been growing in relevance as persistent advancements in communication  technology continue to shrink our world. Major tech powers like Google and  Microsoft have increased their R&D spend on new translator technology,  culminating in an eye catching demo of an instant English-Chinese translator at a recent Microsoft  event.

The increased focus on translation is predicated by the prospective earnings  that can be reaped from the provision of machine-based solutions. Research firm Common Sense Advisory has estimated  that the global market of outsourced language services and technology will earn £21.1 billion in 2012. Furthermore, the proliferation of smartphones has  expanded the consumer base to an even greater extent, as demonstrated by the  Google Translate app’s recorded 50 million plus installs.

Hence the importance of persistent development in  speech translation, which according to Microsoft still offers a word error rate  of 20-25 per cent. Current iterations of the technology incorporate algorithms  that utilise ‘linguistic rules’ which are expressed via the common model of  matching a source word (in the native speaker’s language), to a corresponding  target word (in a chosen foreign language), with further processing via a  phonological corpus – a database that consists of the grammatical rules and  vocabulary of multiple languages – being required to place the words in  appropriate contextual order.

Google Translate

This is by far the most prolific mobile translation application, allowing for  text based translation in 65 languages and also providing real-time speech  translation for 17 languages (including English, Arabic, French and Dutch).

Its “conversation mode” was originally released in ALPHA last year and  currently remains an Android specific feature. The speech to speech function is  operated via a single handset, where the user is required to first pick both  native and foreign languages then after tapping the microphone icon, speak the  phrase to be translated. The application then speaks back the translated speech  and allows the foreign speaker to reply in their own language by doing the  same.

Ortsbo

This Canadian company provides a social networking solution to real time  translation by utilising plugins for most instant chat and messaging platforms  such as Windows Live, Google Talk and Facebook Chat. The user is only required  to select the output language and then begin typing in the chat box as they  normally would. This feature is also available in a free mobile app for both Android and iOS called Ortsbo 2GO.

Ortsbo can translate 53 global languages – including English, Chinese and  Arabic. The company also provides a Twitter service that allows its users to  place a widget that can pull tweets from a specific account or hash tag and  provide instant translation.

Ortsbo also provides a face to face solution in the form of its iPad and Windows Phone app, one2one, which much like Google translate  allows for two-way translation through the use of one device.

Vocre

MyLanguage’s Vocre application performs live translated video calling for iOS devices in 31 languages. The user dials out from within  the app and then is required to hit a record button before they speak into the  enabled mobile device and watch as their words are converted to text. After  making sure that the text entry is correct the user must then click reply and  the text is repeated in the chosen foreign language by a synthesised voice.

Much like Ortsbo and Google Translates mobile offerings the app gives face to  face functionality.

Hanashite Hon’yaku (automatic voice translation service)

Hanashite Hon’yaku is exclusive to Japan and more  specifically subscribers to the country’s largest network provider, NTT Docomo.  Much like Google Translate the service facilitates the use of face to face  translation through a single enabled mobile, what sets it apart however, is its  ability to translate actual phone conversations in real-time.

It provides spoken translation after a short pause as well as providing a  text transcript. The user is required to dial out via a provided smartphone  application, which allows for calls to be placed to overseas, mobile or  landline. The phone translations are being limited to Japanese, Korean, Chinese  and English, furthermore, by utilising cloud computing the accuracy of the  translations are not limited by a phones specification.

Lexifone

This Israeli start-up has foregone the app route in favour of a  dial up service that provides live call translations on any phone. The service  currently operates in 100 countries and can translate 15 languages and  dialects.

This is the only service I’ve listed that requires no Internet connection or  software install, the user must first dial an access number (found on the Lexifone site)  prior to dialing the call recipient. Much like the previously listed speech to  speech services, translation comes after a momentary pause as a tone signifies  when to begin talking. The service allows the listener to review the translation  in their own language before sending, thus ensuring the message is  accurate.

The company has deals in place with telecommunication titans BT Group  and Telefonica, providing Lexifone with Euro-wide coverage.

That is where the future of this technology lies and software giant Microsoft  believes the use of the speaker’s actual voice in translation is central to  this. At the aforementioned event held in China last month the computing  behemoth demoed its instant English to Mandarin translator with the spoken  translated output replicating the speaker’s voice and cadence.

French firm Alcatel – Lucent also hopes to launch a voice replicator called  MyVoice as a complement to its landline based translator WeTalk, which is a more  immediate sign of this technologies growth trajectory.

Thanks to breakthroughs in telecommunications, the world is becoming a  smaller place each and every day. As a consequence multilingualism is fast  becoming a necessity, and hopefully we’ll one day be able to speak to anyone, in  any country, in any language, all in real-time.

Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2012/12/11/real-time-translator-overview/#ixzz2Ejak0t6N

Save Money and Time on translation Services

Presently, the translation industry is quite disorganised in the sense that there are immense job opportunities in the corporate as well as government sectors but the supply of skilled and efficient manpower to fill the vacancies is lacking. The novice translators with inappropriate training and partial understanding of language do more harm than good in their field of work,” says Sandeep Nulkar, CMD BITS Private Limited,

I could not agree more some organisations pay a lot of money for transaltors in the belief that they are getting good value for money.  In my experience that is fine when the person is trained, knows their language well and is unbiased.  Day by day we hear more stories of the Police, NHS and teachers paying thousands of pounds to translators only to find that they have sided with the criminal and not supported the police, or given inaccurate accounts of information nurses have asked to be conveyed to patients.  Quite apart from the time it can take to wait for an appropriate translator to arrive  and the cost to the organisation in the intervening times I am not sure why everyone still continues to do exactly what has been done before rather than looking for a more personal solution.

Here at EMASUK we have tried to bridge the gap, and support vulnerable people with a cost effective solution that not only saves money in translation costs, but also saves time and makes the victim, learner or customer feel more cared for, and the officer or frontline staff confidence and have the feeling of being back in charge. This simple solution used effectively can save time and support frontline staff who can be faced with a person who pretends not to speak English, there will be no loophole for them. With our systems it is possible to communicate effectively and capture those safeguarding moments, or initial answers to questions, thereby ensuring valuable time is not lost in the waiting process. Newport City Council is one such council that is offering our service to support their interactions with new arrivals or those who speak little or no English. We are hoping that others will follow their lead.

Local councils use EMASUK resources to communicate with New arrivals or those with little or no English.